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The rediscovery of Starlite in a formula for black snake fireworks?

Discussion in 'The Case For...' started by shamangineer, Apr 14, 2019.

  1. shamangineer

    shamangineer Well-Known Member

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    Starlite vs Thermite:


    very impressive results.
     
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  2. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Well-Known Member

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    Wow, that's a mind blowing material and recipe!
    Thank you for sharing this, it looks very promising for insulation. Wonder if it does reflect EMFs as well. Or, if the glue would be substitutable with say, water and wheat to make it sticky, perhaps?
    Also, what a great synchronicity with today's episode. It's almost a corn bread recipe :D
     
  3. shamangineer

    shamangineer Well-Known Member

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    Shou Sugi Ban is a technique of charring exterior timber to make it fairly fire-retardant, rot-proof, and has approximately 100 year lifespan.

    While the char on wood does not really insulate due to it not being a carbon foam like the Starlite, if using Starlite externally to prevent fire would work in the short-term; I wouldn't think it would really be durable enough to use as siding and would kinda look like you lived in a giant scab. The wooden siding would probably look more natural and have the grain show through.

    With regard to emfs, carbon is mildly conductive so it would likely have a dampening effect if a solid skin was formed, but I don't know if it would be enough on it's own to block EMFs.

    With regard to the binder, wheat would probably work, but not as well as elmers as it would be like a dried up dough which would tend to crack and crumble. But it would also probably stink less when fired.

    For a natural/waterproof/nontoxic binder and perhaps more durable alternative that could be left uncharred, pine pitch / tar would be a decent place to start. If you need to modify the properties you would need to find specific growing conditions or other plants with the desirable properties for their sap. And I bet that shit would smell amazing when it burned. In order to increase durability having the starlite made into a composite with a fabric (similar to linoleum tile backed with cloth) would be a good idea too.
     
    #3 shamangineer, Apr 15, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019
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  4. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Well-Known Member

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    That's so interesting! Thank you for the details and the video. The texture on that wood looks amazing.
    I'm never ceased to be amazed by new discoveries.:rolleyes:
     
  5. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Well-Known Member

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    I’ve been wondering lately, in the context of kilns for making biochar: since Starlite seems so effective at deflecting heat, would it possibly help make an oven more efficient in the production of biochar.
    I would assume so, but that’s just my assumption.
     
  6. shamangineer

    shamangineer Well-Known Member

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    yes, but It will be friable and liable to breakage which would require frequent maintenance unless in a static location and doesn't get bumped (which will happen when charring). You would be better off with fire bricks unless you plan on going past their temperature rating (not required for charring).
     
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