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Polishing Logic - Your Shining Armor

Discussion in 'Wild Card Forum' started by fifthcolumn, May 20, 2019.

  1. fifthcolumn

    fifthcolumn Active Member

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    Your critical thinking skills are fundamentally necessary to everyday existence. You exercise them without thinking about it most times and you are better off for it. Many times this is easy. "This chick really hates Trump," and "I want to bang this chick," therefor "I won't bring up Trump and kill the mood." Or "I wanna get baked," and "I'm outta weed," therefor "I'll scrape some resin outta my pipe." Easy and Useful.

    Usually, even unpolished logic can get you through the day. This simple A + B = C is good enough for most tasks.

    But what happens when someone tells you something complex like "Love is the opposite of Fear?" Or "One should not Judge?" These require a few more steps of critical analysis in order to decide whether they are true and whether you should adjust your behavior accordingly.

    There are a few useful tactics you can use to enhance your Critical Thinking Skills.


    Translate the statement into other terms.


    "Love is the opposite of Fear." Well, what is Love? What is Fear? And what is Opposite?

    Love - is a measure of my affinity for something; how much I like something and want to be around it.

    Fear - is a measure of how safe I feel with something; how secure I feel with something.

    Opposite things are the same in nature, but different in degree. Hot and Cold are of the same "nature" - temperature - but they vary in degree. Soft and Hard are descriptions of "texture" or "solidity" and they describe the different degrees of solidity that things can possess.

    Opposites describe the opposing ends of the spectrum regarding the nature something. You can't experience opposites at the same time from the same thing. Something that is hot cannot be described as also cold. Soft cannot also be hard. Day cannot also be night. We can experience the midpoints of the spectrum, where they blend into one another, but not the opposing points of the spectrum at the same time.

    If Love is a measure of how much I like something and Fear is a measure of how secure I feel with something, are they the same in nature? No. Love's nature is affinity, and Fear's nature is security. Therefor, they cannot be opposites.


    Think of good examples from your own experience to back up your new premise.


    If our new premise is "Love and Fear are not opposites," then we can test that premise with examples from our own experience. If we can't find anything to back up the new premise, then we might have to throw it out.

    Roller Coasters. I have been on roller coasters that terrified me and I loved every minute of it.

    Broccoli. I feel the exact opposite of Love when I think of eating broccoli. I have never even been mildly startled by broccoli, much less actively Fear it.

    I sponsored a tiger at a sanctuary for a while. They let me bring him toys and feed him through the cage. I loved that cat. But I damn sure wasn't getting into the cage with him.

    Because we can "logically" come to the premise that "Love and Fear are not opposites," and we can back up that premise with real-world experience, then we can be pretty sure the premise is valid. At least partially.


    Take things to the extreme.


    When someone asserts that "There is no right and wrong," or "There is no good or bad," I offer to brutally rape and torture them. To test the theory. Never had any takers. That's because they have (quite rightly) judged that being raped and tortured would be a "bad" thing for them.

    When someone tells me never to judge a person, I present this scenario: If a man comes to your door, wanting to babysit your children, and he's got his criminal record with him which consists of 500 offenses - all child rape - does he get to babysit your kids?

    New Age speaker Abraham Hicks is fond of saying "Wherever you stand, you are in the best place you ever stood." What about the asshole sacrificing an infant to Moloch? Is he in the best place he ever stood? What about the infant? Is the child being torturously murdered in the best place he ever stood? Seems like even 20 minutes before would be better than where he is right now.

    When you take things to the extreme, you can determine whether or not an assertion is an "absolute truth," or something that's just true sometimes. Much New Age philosophy makes assertions of absolute truth. An absolute truth only needs to be wrong once to make it not absolutely true. The ends of the spectrum - the extremes - are the easiest way to test assertions of absolute truth.


    Get to know the Logical Fallacies.


    Logical Fallacies are incredibly useful in determining the validity of a claim. If all of the arguments used to back up a claim are logically fallacious, the claim is not yet proven to be valid. It isn't proven to be false, either. It just isn't proven yet. Learn the logical fallacies and get good at picking them out when someone is asserting a claim.

    Beware: The "Oily Appendages of the Elite" are trying desperately to modify the Logical Fallacy known as the Appeal To Authority.

    The Appeal to Authority essentially states that "Just because this guy's got a PhD, doesn't mean he's right." Scientists and institutions can be wrong. Do not take their word for it just because they claim to be an authority on the subject.

    Many websites are now modifying the Appeal to Authority with disclaimers that read:

    "It's important to note that this fallacy should not be used to dismiss the claims of experts, or scientific consensus. Appeals to authority are not valid arguments, but nor is it reasonable to disregard the claims of experts who have a demonstrated depth of knowledge unless one has a similar level of understanding and/or access to empirical evidence."

    The "claims of experts" and "scientific consensus" are precisely what the Appeal To Authority logical fallacy was designed to keep in check.

    In fact, the phrase "nor is it reasonable to disregard the claims of experts who have a demonstrated depth of knowledge" is, itself, an Appeal To Authority.

    All of us THC'ers know that most scientists and experts will not acknowledge "empirical evidence" that does not conform to the "scientific consensus."


    The use of Logic and Reason is your best protection from lizards spinning lies to enslave you. Emotion and "feelings" can mislead you in determining the validity of a claim. The best lies are the ones that make you feel good (the Appeal To Emotion logical fallacy).

    If you polish and perfect your skill with logic, you will be armored against the next set of comforting lies dripped from the tongues of reptiles.
     
    #1 fifthcolumn, May 20, 2019
    Last edited: May 21, 2019
  2. shamangineer

    shamangineer Well-Known Member

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    You must go deeper. Logic is dependent on external knowledge which is always incomplete. With a small enough information pool anything can be judged as logical. The truth is in the connection to the living universe and is experienced through feelings. I am not saying logic and judgement does not have a place and cannot be useful tools, but when these are the hammers you use to bash every problem you will find unacknowledged perspectives in the shattered pieces.
     
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  3. nickzeptepi

    nickzeptepi Active Member

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    I agree getting to know logical fallacies is a great thing.

    I read somewhere- anxiety & excited feel very similar in the body, even have similar chemical release. It's the story we tell ourselves in the mind that flips the switch from being excited or anxious about the thing we're going to do.
     
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  4. fifthcolumn

    fifthcolumn Active Member

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    You must go deeper. Logic is dependent on external knowledge which is always incomplete. With a small enough information pool anything can be judged as logical.

    Agreed. Humility is wise to exercise along the path. However, its overuse can also be a hindrance.

    The truth is in the connection to the living universe and is experienced through feelings.

    Yes, but are you saying we cannot arrive at that conclusion logically? It seems very logical to say "The universe has existed a long time in a relative state of harmony" and "I am part of the universe," therefor "If I want to be around a long time, I should attempt to synchronize with this harmony."

    Once we have come to this Guiding Principle of "connection," how do we go about implementing the physical and social strategies that will lead us into a more harmonious connection? Should we allow how we feel about any particular strategy to determine our usage of it? Or should we logically analyze and test each strategy to determine which ones will get us to this "connection" more perfectly?

    I think one of our biggest problems today is that far too many people "feel" like our government is keeping them safe from terrorists, while never critically analyzing that premise. Many "feel" like a wall will keep people out and make america great again, without ever once analyzing the facts of the matter.

    I am not saying logic and judgement does not have a place and cannot be useful tools, but when these are the hammers you use to bash every problem you will find unacknowledged perspectives in the shattered pieces.

    Thank you for this, Shaman. You have just perfectly demonstrated the "Straw Man" Logical Fallacy. I have not suggested using logic as a hammer to bash every problem. I have suggested using logic as a scalpel to carefully dismember an assertion to discover if it is valid. Or using it as a torch to highlight the areas in which asserted "absolute truths" are not absolute.

    And I agree that it is not logical to use the same tool on every problem, or to destroy the problem without regard for any unacknowledged (and potentially useful) perspectives contained within.


    But I think one of the problems with my original post is highlighted by your arguments. The phrase "Emotion and "feelings" won't help you determine the truth of a matter," is a little "hammerish." Perhaps, "Emotion and "feelings" can mislead you in determining the validity of a claim," is a more "scalpel" way of putting it. I will make the change now, and if you can think of a better way of putting it, let me know.

     
  5. fifthcolumn

    fifthcolumn Active Member

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    I read somewhere- anxiety & excited feel very similar in the body, even have similar chemical release. It's the story we tell ourselves in the mind that flips the switch from being excited or anxious about the thing we're going to do.

    I think this is an extremely salient point in the context of this conversation.

    "The story we tell ourselves" can be the difference between an infuriating clusterfuck and a new challenge we can rise up to meet. Some people do this naturally. Most of us must learn how to avoid the knee-jerk emotions and logically determine where we want our story to go.
     
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  6. rani

    rani Well-Known Member

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    Your mate Lew Paxton Price has a great primer on his website. But I agree we need a range of tools to evaluate material.

    One of my friends sent me a video on climate change arguments, and it was fine as it stood, but it was binary. CO2 good, CO2 baaaaaad. I personally take a third position, and I'm sure there are a whole bunch more perspectives, but we are too schooled in the Hegelian dialectic to even consider that there may be more than two options.
     
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  7. shamangineer

    shamangineer Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
     
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  8. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    Nikola Tesla is such a wonderful example for the importance of intuition.

    This may or may not relate, but, in my previous remote viewing exercises, I've often found that I had better, more accurate results when the I followed my initial hunch within the first 30s, versus spending a good deal of time meditating on it (the process of getting all the noise and sifting through(that should come later)). Sure, I wouldn't get all the details, but the flash of insight would usually be far more effective.

    I've come to think those flashes, what I call insights, are like seeds that appear. 99% of the time I dismiss them (what a f-ing waste!!) but every now and then, I scribble them down because it may lead to something. Logic for me usually comes after that process, to make sense of whether I'm being dishonest with my self.

    And questions, I'm still learning to ask better questions, for questions usually lead to surprising answers.
     
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  9. fifthcolumn

    fifthcolumn Active Member

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    It is a shame that Tesla's finer fibers were unable to perceive the truth concerning the lies of the Lizard of Menlo Park and the predatory profit motives of the robber barons who destroyed him and stole his technologies.
     
  10. fifthcolumn

    fifthcolumn Active Member

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    Nikola Tesla is such a wonderful example for the importance of intuition.

    Agreed. Many of us have not honed our intuition enough yet to receive the benefits Tesla did. We are forced to rely on other means.

    in my previous remote viewing exercises, I've often found that I had better, more accurate results when the I followed my initial hunch

    I have no experience with RV, but everything I've heard from RV'ers agrees with this. This seems to definitely be an area where Logic will do you more harm than good.

    but every now and then, I scribble them down because it may lead to something.

    Man, I wish I could get better at doing this. Need to carry around a notebook.
     
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  11. shamangineer

    shamangineer Well-Known Member

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    The secret is getting out of your own way by setting aside ego and logic temporarily. As Enjoypolo said, applying logic and following your curiosity after the insight is where much of the learning happens.
     
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  12. fifthcolumn

    fifthcolumn Active Member

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    I think this is wise.

    The model I use would suggest using your "feminine, creative, intuitive, and emotional 'right brain'" to determine your ultimate goal / guiding principles / direction of travel. This is the realm of insight. Then employing the critical analysis of the "masculine, logical, judging, and reasoning 'left brain'" to determine the nuts and bolts of getting the job done. It's not an absolute division of labor, but a general one.

    Both emotion and reason have tasks that they are better suited for and it is beneficial to hand specific jobs off to the side that possesses the most talent and skill to accomplish them. When both halves are working in harmony, together as equals, you produce a highly effective team that will watch each others' back when entering uncharted terrain.
     
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  13. nickzeptepi

    nickzeptepi Active Member

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  14. shamangineer

    shamangineer Well-Known Member

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    This is an excellent resource if you would like to know more:
    [​IMG]
     
  15. fifthcolumn

    fifthcolumn Active Member

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    Nick,

    That graphic is wonderful!

    I have not seen a better, more concise and easily accessible teaching tool about Logical Fallacies than this one. This is a GREAT FIND, man.
     
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  16. nickzeptepi

    nickzeptepi Active Member

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    Know your logical fallacies - it's like a firewall in your mind against adverts & bullshit.

    "More freshness in every spray" - we increase the dose from 4 to 5ml so you use more and buy more!
     
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  17. shamangineer

    shamangineer Well-Known Member

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    You have see the trap in order to not step in it.
     
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