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Gary Lachman | Holy Russia, Rudolf Steiner, & Cultural Spirits

Discussion in 'THC+ Episodes' started by enjoypolo, Jun 11, 2020.

  1. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    Post your feedback below ;)
     
  2. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    I just got around to this episode (still halfway through), but I've been having more than one synchronicities with Russia (before this ep got released).
    For one, I started reading Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov, a classic of last century's Russian literature, and a really well-written political satire of the Soviet regime. It's on par with La Fontaine, Aesop and the likes. I did read his earlier work, Heart of a Dog (1925) which was written right after the Bolshevik revolution, also, about the ruthless new regime at the time. Both are *excellent* books I'd highly recommend!

    Just like you don't get diamonds without tremendous pressure, you don't get incredible minds without the intensity of living under authoritarian regimes. Western medias like to portray cultures like China and Russia as authoritarian and backwards. While this may certainly be true of their leaders in power, it's quite the opposite for the common folk living we never hear of. I'm always surprised by how creative and courageous some of the "dissidents" are in those countries, in order to go beyond the censorship. This is not to romanticise authoritarian regimes, but rather, a testament to the resilience of the human spirit.

    And yes, to the rest of the World, USA is also symbolised by Trump and Mcdonalds, sorry folks ;)

    Another synchronicity, was from a journalist and writer I follow, Yasha Levine (which I've talked previously about his book). Himself, a former jewish emigré from the USSR.
    He posted a link to a podcast episode where a group of ladies were talking about Epstein and digging (or rather, scraping the surface of) the proverbial rabbit hole.

    One of the host, a Russian lady and former model, brought her own insights into the discussion based on her past experiences working in the industry, and at some point, was wondering why/how Americans were generally so surprised and upset with revelations of corruption within their government.

    She was basically saying "We have thousands of Epsteins in Moscow, and everyone knows about it. It's simply the world of oligarchy." I totally sympathised with her feelings.
    Look, it's one thing to be aware of the satanic worshipping at the highest echelons, but the reverse extreme, of believing the fairy-tales that politicians (autocrats) in their ivory towers have the people's best interests at their heart, despite all the apparent systemic problems strikes me as infantile naive denialism, and the polar opposite of "American Exceptionalism".
    Needless to say, I'm painting with very broad brush-strokes here, and it certainly wouldn't include THC listeners. I've also witnessed the same taboo/incredulity to corruption elsewhere.

    Greg also made a great point that it's only when you get out beyond your country's boundaries that you realise about how stereotypically american (or otherwise) you are. And that is a point well worth emphasising.
    Which is why I think, traveling and experiencing different cultures is important. Not only to discover what's out there, but most importantly, from that experience, to be able to discover yourself and realise what we've always taken for granted in the fish-bowl.
    This goes back to how diversity (of anything) is always the key to success and resilience (and why, I'd argue something like eugenics is based primarily on a flawed assumption, regardless even of morality/ethics). But I digress.

    Anyways, all this to say, I love episodes like this that get out of the home-stage and explore different culture.;) Sorry for the long rant :D:p
     
    #2 enjoypolo, Jun 16, 2020
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2020