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Biomimicry & The Blue Economy

Discussion in 'THC Entrepreneurs' started by enjoypolo, Nov 27, 2018.

  1. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Well-Known Member

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    Hi Everyone,
    I discovered the book sharing platform BookCrossing this morning, and thought I'd share it here. I'll be moving soon, so getting rid of some books is unfortunately a necessity. But instead of selling them, I'd much rather find someone interested in them. BookCrossing allows you to register a book, get a #BCID that you can attach to the book, so that people can not only take the books, but track the book on the site, and write something about it, and pass it on to someone else. It's a cool concept, and very simple to use.

    Also, if anyone here is interested in some titles, I'd be happy to send them to you (though shipping costs are a bitch in Canada), so pick-up ideally? Anyways, Oh also this database is great for finding P2P platforms:

    https://online-collaboration-tools.zeef.com/robin.good (ZEEF)

    PS: More Dew harvester ideas:
     
    #41 enjoypolo, May 12, 2019
    Last edited: May 13, 2019
  2. shamangineer

    shamangineer Well-Known Member

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  3. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Well-Known Member

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    So it's been some time since I posted here, and quite frankly, since I looked into the blue economy. The past few months have been so animated, that I got a bit side-tracked by current events and social outburts (not that they're un-important), from the things that inspire me most, Nature.

    Thankfully, one of my daily morning chores consists of watering and tending my small balcony garden (the Bio-Lab). Although the surroundings are noisy with the rattlings of construction sites and mechanical machines, the small ecology I nurture is like a peace of mind.
    I've learned much through trials and tribulations, and the plants always teach me things.
    For instance, composting organic waste can be tedious, and I've had to deal with flies and larvaes growing.

    At first, it seemed repulsive. But I learnt to observe them, even to appreciate them, for they are power-eaters that thrive on food-waste (especially green leaf veggies). At the same time, I had to recognize it's bad feng-shui to have flies hovering around the house, so once again, it's a delicate balance to keep. But I digress, what makes me happy is that my beets, carrots and beans are growing, and the oyster mycelia that I spread is slowly, but surely, permeating the soil, and connecting the roots to an underground, energetic-internet for nutrient delivery, as well as moisture retention.

    I have yet to get my hands on Gunter Pauli's recently re-visited Blue Economy book (Version 3.0; 2019), but through him, I came upon Anders Nyquist, a Swedish architect, and founder of Eco Cycle Design, an organization committed to nature-inspired dwellings and architecture.

    I haven't really dug deep into him, yet, but what I've come across so far is impressive, and he's often mentioned by Pauli as one of the pioneers, and achievers in this field. The videos below show some of implemented ideas, one of a school that uses natural air-flows to cool the building without the use of electricity (Natural AC), inspired by termites' mound flows. Others include using plants as bio-filters that can clean-up the chemicals in the air, while feeding plants with CO2.

    Somehow, one of the recent THC episodes mentioned how air-flow is important for feng-shui (as well as pathogens), so it reminded me of this.





    Last one I want to mention is this interview of Anders Nyquist by Alexander Prinsen, whom I have previously come across his Youtube Channel interviewing Curt Hallberg, another Swedish engineer, and founder of WatreCo. this one manufacturing Water Vortexers inspired by Viktor Schaubergers previous work. He's a regular at the Water Conference, and very inspiring. His technology has been licensed to company called RealIce, is actually now in-use in my own neighbourhood, the Rogers Arena (Vancouver's Canuck ice-hockey ring). By using vortexed water, they are able to make tougher, more energy-efficient method of creating ice surface. So it's kinda cool that Schaubergers tech is powering Canada's national sport (though I'm totally disconnected from Sports in general..)




    Peace;):rolleyes:

    PS: In the last video (interview), around the 30min mark, one of the things I was blown away was Nyquist mentioning a case of self-powering buildings, a project that involved a McDonald's, and two other (I can't remember). And they installed a heat-exchanger in the kitchen which was turning the heat produced into heating that was used for the two other buildings.
    "Energy from hamburgers" as he says. Incredible. Though the McDs might not be the best food to eat, it's a brilliant example of what is feasible.
     

    Attached Files:

    #43 enjoypolo, Jun 10, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019
  4. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Well-Known Member

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    The Universe is blasting me with information about biochar, and its versatility of use as explained by this awesome article from the Biochar Journal titled, The Biochar Displacement Strategy by Kathleen Draper. :eek:

    I previously learned about soil enrichment, but the article makes a case that it can be used in anything from water filtration (think Brita and their water filters), but also their ability to lower radioactivity, make batteries. It seems like the best "sponge" Nature provides, and I'm finally starting to understand why graphene is touted as the big thing.

    Best of all, as the article points out, it looks like a perfect fit for a circular economy type project.
    Aqueous Solutions is a team of people doing just that in Thailand apparently. :rolleyes:

    Also, Living Web Farms looks like one of those gifts from heaven:
     
    #44 enjoypolo, Jun 11, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019
    rani likes this.
  5. rani

    rani Active Member

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    DUDE! SAME! We are so in sync recently it's spooky!

    I'm so in love with bio char I have just begun the journey to starting a biochar production company. I made a burner last weekend from scrap material and did my first burn yesterday...probably while you were posting about biochar! >_< The material was a bit wet, so it didn't burn great, but I'm going to keep trying.

    When I get going, I'm going to make a kon tiki burner, as a friend is teaching me how to weld. With that, you can produce 5400 kg of char over 10 burns.

    Biochar indeed has many many uses. Here are 55 of them!

    http://www.ithaka-journal.net/55-anwendungen-von-pflanzenkohle?lang=en

    Also noteworthy, in certain burners, the 'waste' natural gas coming off the burner can be used to heat/power other things!

    Next step is to DIY a vortex compost tea brewer. Working out which pump I need (and can actually purchase in Australia) is proving to be complicated... It seems to be a shite one for 30 bucks or an overpowered one for 700 bucks and not much in between.

     

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  6. shamangineer

    shamangineer Well-Known Member

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    A bilge pump should do the trick and be readily available just about anywhere. An old computer power supply should have enough current to power it, verify the 12V rail amperage (typically listed on a sticker on any decent power supply) to be sure.
     
  7. rani

    rani Active Member

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  8. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Well-Known Member

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    Highly, highly recommend checking the last video I posted from Living Web Farms, even just the first half. Cause the two-barrel system is so incredibly smart, yet low-tech. Like you said, the smoke coming off (noxious gas) is fed back at the bottom and becomes fuel for the coals.
    BTW: That's a whole rabbit hole I've only begun to uncover: That what burns is the gas coming off, not the material itself. But maybe for another time.. :)

    My rhetorical question is, could you also use the heat to convert some of that energy back? Heat-exchanger..

    But yeah, I'm definitely looking in this direction as well. It's low-tech enough, inputs waste and outputs (black) gold; serves communities, the environment, and hopefully, the bottom line as well. On my next reading list is this book by Kathleen Draper (she's incredible) called Burn: Using Fire to Cool the Earth (2019)

    By the way, that dude in the video above is eating the f-ing coals and he's like "yeah, looks great"! it's hilarious!
    Please keep us posted on your kiln, very exciting stuff! Good luck with it Rani!

    PS:
    Would a solar-powered pump, such as this one, work for your vortexer? Assuming you're having a lot of sun where you're at.

    PPS: I finished the video, and wow, getting energy from burning carbon materials. The output gas the guy is demonstrating is just non-smoke, heat coming out of the pipe (because all the gas is burnt in the barrel-top). Spoiler alert: The Q&A at towards the end is ripe for inspiration, with question regarding using waste; biochar production in disaster relief areas (makes the carbon filters to use to sanitize water), and by delivering energy and heat from burning the post-disaster waste; cooking using the heat produced (37min-mark).
    Limitless. I personally like the garbage can that produces your cooking stove (or pizza oven) for you to eat.:rolleyes::D
     
    #48 enjoypolo, Jun 12, 2019 at 3:16 AM
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019 at 4:33 AM
  9. shamangineer

    shamangineer Well-Known Member

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    Just remember the inrush current to a motor can be twice the normal current. If you are in the 5A range look for a 10A LED power supply and get a mating barrel connector for the pump. The 1000 gph pump is 16.7 gpm, it should probably be sized for a 2-3 min turnover of the reservoir volume for decent circulation and aeration. You can get a switch with male and female barrel to turn it on and off if you like or add a 12V speed control circuit. A speed control circuit will have it's own current draw. When in doubt, oversize your power supply.
    [​IMG]
     
    #49 shamangineer, Jun 15, 2019 at 2:31 AM
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2019 at 6:55 PM
    1 person likes this.