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Biomimicry & The Blue Economy

Discussion in 'THC Entrepreneurs' started by enjoypolo, Nov 27, 2018.

  1. shamangineer

    shamangineer Well-Known Member

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    From what I have been able to find in the science most insects ride on vortices that they induce in the air, but I am not convinced that this would entrain enough ether or that it would be oriented correctly to induce lift on an etheric level, just a form of aerodynamics. Basically what Grebennikov conteded was that some insects, and specifically one endangered beetle he had found used another form of flight which used etheric flows to induce levitation. I have attached a picture where someone who claimed to have found the correct beetle had used an electron microscope to show the structure which was repeated in an array on the underside of the beetle wing which looked like a cone (phi-angle?) which was embedded in the surface and had an orifice in the surface at it's peak. From the scale it looks like ~2.5 microns for the orifice diameter and perhaps 7-10 microns for the depth of the cone in the arrayed structure if it were a phi-angle cone. Anonymous information is worth what you pay for it so grain of salt and all that, but perhaps it will yield some clues.

    The following conveyed is on the level of rumor:
    One thing I have heard is that the craft he made, a kind of etheric scooter, used a step-up circuit to create 16 KV of electrostatic voltage on a plate (using a 9V battery) behind the beetle wings which were on a fan-structure to control lift in each quadrant of the vehicle embedded in his art-case.

    From other research the threshold of electrogravitic action is approximately 30 KV, but what if the thrust were augmented with focusing structures to cause a greater localized reaction in the medium of the ether? Just a thought. One thing to keep in mind if one would endeavour to re-create Grebbenikov's etheric scooter is that he claimed it had negative health effects with prolonged use. I would speculate that this is due to unshielded etheric flows of high intensity degrading cellular and metabolic cohesion due to a differential temporal distribution. I have thought that perhaps a similar temporal effect was at work, although at a much higher intensity, in the Nazi bell experiments.
     

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    #21 shamangineer, Mar 3, 2019
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  2. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    Wow, thank you for the details Shamangineer.
    The technicalities are way over my head, and most likely not worth the risks. :D
    Fascinating stuff nonetheless. Grebennikov is so underrated..
     
  3. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    I've been letting that info you mentioned last night cogitate in my head.
    High-voltage: isn't that how lifters are able to counter-gravity (T-Townsend Brown)?
    It also reminds me Dr Pollack's research on electrostatic forces that may in fact account for how birds are able to stay in the air (Puts the whole notion of "gliding" on its head, really, as well as spiders able to fly).

    The enigma of the small cones remains though, and we know form affects function including pyramid structures (which is a sharp-angle cone, right?).
    If I remember correctly, Grebennikov mentioned how flower shapes, or even egg cartons affect the flow of the field, which insects, like bees pick-up on their radar.
    Although I'm probably mis-paraphrasing his views.

    The Phi-ratio is another giant, fascinating rabbit hole. But it begs the question, if it works on micro-scale, shouldn't we be able to replicate it at a larger scale?
    I appreciate your input on this Shamangineer.

    I can't wait to try the Flying Kayak from Howl's Moving Castle someday:rolleyes:
    [​IMG]

    PS: A lot of these Ghibli movies have incredible flying crafts that either biomimic, or look straight out of Delschau's books! Interesting..!
     
    #23 enjoypolo, Mar 3, 2019
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2019
  4. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    This is a cool show by RT about a creative bunch living in cool dwellings.

    EDIT: Wow, they have a pretty cool website, and an app with the designs.
     
    #24 enjoypolo, Mar 4, 2019
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2019
  5. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    The Plant in Chicago doing the Lord's work.:rolleyes:

    Other inspirations recently discovered I'm planning on trying soon (Spring's coming!):
    Kratky method: A hydroponics, but without any power (pump) needed.
     
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  6. shamangineer

    shamangineer Well-Known Member

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    micro-fragmentation for coral reef restoration:
     
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  7. rani

    rani Well-Known Member

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    That coral restoration video was absolutely beautiful. Another great example of life co-operating, not competing. The problems we have with the great barrier reef at the moment is that it is being taken over with crown of thorns corals which are extremely aggressive and throny as the name suggests. Current 'best practice' in dealing with them is to go and individually inject each one with poison. There was a few million dollar chucked at the problem, and inevitably, the local politicians just pocketed the money.

    And in regards to the eco architecture, you might enjoy the film of michael reynolds, also known as the garbage warrior. Who designed the house that is in the still of the film clip.

     
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  8. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    Absolutely love these vids about coral restoration, and Earthships home building!

    I just finished watching the documentary Garbage Warrior, and it got me so enthralled about it all, that I decided to purchase their App featuring a bunch of designs for various purposes, as well as their blueprints and so much more.

    What’s even better, is how much room there is for progress, by combining knowledges from the Blue Economy initiatives, to stuff like aired-concrete/hempcretr, as well as Schauberger’s Water insights.
    The latter in particular I think would be useful for Health & Sanitation, since the centripetal forces greatly annhilate bacteria/viruses (for human waste management), as well as lead to healthier plant growth; and positive effects on the skin to name a few. It goes without saying, vortexing for grey water filtration is also well-suited & demonstrated.

    The Stuttgart experiment findings are always in the back of my head, where the Kudu horn pipe designs suck in water, thereby could potentially get rid of pumps altogether (or at least reduce the energy load).

    Another great treasure trove is the Ohmasa Gas, discovered by Omasa, a Japanese engineer who found out a way via water cavitation thru electrolysis, creating “nano-bubbles” that separate not only hydrogen & oxygen, but an altogether separate gas (HHO?) that can burn thru tungsten like hot knife in butter. It can even be used to run a car outfitted with a propane-engine. I’m at work now, but i’ll post some videos later.

    Another incredible invention is the ability to suck out, and collect dew from the environment (especially nearby plants and trees where humidity is higher).

    I’m gonna research more on each of these modalities, and hopefully, one day be able to apply some of them in concrete fashion. The only thing I can’t foresee water being used in, is shelter. But then again, with fourth phase crystal-like water, maybe we can build “water-walls” one day. Who know!
     
  9. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    The last THC episode with Peter Allen and his work at Mastodon Farms, was not only epic but sort of merged with a lot of what's been shared on the forum. I appreciate a lot for what Greg has put in this interview: notably the case for more self-reliance and more System's thinking approach with the ecology; or the part with Rudolf Steiner and being more well-versed in identifying landscapes.
    I would certainly hope the show addresses Plants, and Food(s) as well as the stuff discussed, here and elsewhere on the forum.

    I discovered this free periodical titled Zygote Quarterly, dedicated to publishing Nature inspired designs as well as sciences that are biomimic. The first article in the latest issue named You crack me Up! by Tom Keage (p10-11), is featuring a structural investigation of the abalone and conch's nacre shells, including what makes them so strong, and not prone to crack.
    Some aspect, like the sandwiched layering of elements aspect in particular is that there seems to tiny, thin sheaths, nanometers in size, that stabilize the cells around, making it resilient.

    Highly interesting read if you enjoy this sort of stuff.

    By the way, I've always had a weird interest of mine, which are toilets, and I've been thinking the seashell spiral shape may make for a nice urinal. :eek::D right up my alley:rolleyes:o_O
    [​IMG]
    But I would put the seashell horizontally, to make it vortex on its way down.
    Interestingly, Youtube showed me a recommended video about French permaculturists who are collecting their own urine, dilluting it with water (1:20 urine to water) and using it as fertilizer with great results. It got me thinking: holy shit, even human waste is gold if we can collect it, separate it, and use it for growing plants. What better way than vortexing to collect the minerals, while killing the anaerobic bacteria that could be harmful. Does that mean we may not even need sewage systems in the utopic-future?
    But as always, just stoner thoughts.

    But jokes aside, I would love an episode with Gunter Pauli, to talk about the ways in which are described in his books and videos online.

    EDIT 2: ShamanG, I stumbled upon one of your links regarding the use of charcoal and paramagnetism. Incredible knowledge. As a stoner, I recently started collecting and mixing my joint butts from the ash-tray to mix into my mini-compost. Since it's all 100% hemp-made (even the paper/butts), I don't see the inconvenient (though I could be wrong).


    Some other links:
     
    #29 enjoypolo, Apr 15, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019
  10. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    (forward to 56mins for Water harvesting part)

    After yesterday's episode on agriculture and farming, it got me thinking back to Blue Economy. Particularly, methods of farming that harvest water from the oceans and the atmosphere. So I will be sharing a couple links relating to this. The video above shows Gunter Pauli talking about a farm in Australia that uses water condensate system that gets cold water from the ocean (below 10meters) being circulated in pipes through the Aussie desert crop field which then goes back to the ocean.

    The holy grail is that the temperature difference between when the deep-sea water goes thru the surface creates condensation that waters plants. (Or alternatively, water can be stored in a tank, and then used to water the crops). Pauli goes on to say how this circular system creates a pump that never needs external power because the feedback is constant.
    This is so cool, and it smacked me in the face because of it's so "obvious" and "of course you can do that!". Anyone's who had a cold beverage in a hot summer weather knows what condensation on the cup looks like.
    Not to mention the growth of greens will release humidity and create a micro-climate with more rainfall. Turning deserts into an oasis.

    Kudos to Charlie Paton who writes about his company experiences, Seawater Greenhouse here, and here. They are working on projects in Australia, Somalia, Middle East, and other hot, dry regions.

    Links: https://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2011/02/18/seawater-greenhouses-produce-tomatoes-in-the-desert/
    [​IMG]
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2...igating-crops-with-condensation-sytem/9760120


    In the book about Viktor Schauberger by Callum Coats, I remember this one diagram showing a similar setup using temperature gradiant (delta T) between warmer surface water and deeper cool water, to power an over-unity turbine generating electricity. It seems like combining the turbine with the condensation mechanism could literally create an off-grid self-sustaining farm at large scales, next to the ocean.

    2) This one, from the biomimicry website AskNature, is a proof-of-concept that harvests dew water from nearby vegetation.
    Called the Chaac-ha Water System, it's basically an inside-out umbrella that collects water on a hydrophobic surface, and directs into a tank using nothing but the force of gravity. It's able to collect rainwater, as well as a couple liters of water per night, from the air (dew) alone.

    These things blow my mind away. Speaking of hydrophobic surfaces, I've been paying attention when I cook, at certain veggies, like bamboo shoots or onions brown outer layer, how their skin repels water. Bamboo shoots use tiny hairs (like the lotus leaves or mycelium's hyphae) that makes the water trickle down (like a gore-tex rainjacket) and keeps it dry.
    Onions outer protective layer seems to use a different mechanism altogether, but still manages to do the same. (I think it also repels UV light)


    Other related links:
    Sundrop Farms, Adelaide, Australia

    Case 41 - Electricity from Sea Currents
    Case 42 - Electricity from the tap




    Edit
    : The Namib Desert Beetle gets its water from dew of the ocean winds, thanks to its state-of-the-art shell with micro-grooves and bumps. Wow, what an incredible feat. (source: Guardian, 2016)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    #30 enjoypolo, Apr 15, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2019
  11. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    Came across a poem that I feel expresses the Holo-Fractal Nature so beautifully, I wanted to share it here.

    Clouds In Each Paper
    Thich Nhat Hanh
    [​IMG]

    If you are a poet, you will see clearly that there is a cloud floating in this sheet of paper. Without a cloud, there will be no rain; without rain, the trees cannot grow: and without trees, we cannot make paper. The cloud is essential for the paper to exist. If the cloud is not here, the sheet of paper cannot be here either. So we can say that the cloud and the paper inter-are.

    "Interbeing" is a word that is not in the dictionary yet, but if we combine the prefix "inter" with the verb "to be", we have a new verb, inter-be. Without a cloud, we cannot have paper, so we can say that the cloud and the sheet of paper inter-are.

    If we look into this sheet of paper even more deeply, we can see the sunshine in it. If the sunshine is not there, the forest cannot grow. In fact nothing can grow. Even we cannot grow without sunshine. And so, we know that the sunshine is also in this sheet of paper. The paper and the sunshine inter-are. And if we continue to look we can see the logger who cut the tree and brought it to the mill to be transformed into paper. And we see the wheat. We know that the logger cannot exist without his daily bread, and therefore the wheat that became his bread is also in this sheet of paper. And the logger's father and mother are in it too. When we look in this way we see that without all of these things, this sheet of paper cannot exist.


    -- Thich Nhat Hanh
     
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  12. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    I came back last night from a nice, short trip out of the city on Salt Spring Island.
    On the way back, I was listening to a much-awaited Joe Rogan Podcast with Graham Hancock (!!) for the release of his upcoming book (if not already released) America Before.
    Haven't finished listening to it just yet, but so much good content that goes right into THC territory.

    One in particular that I found synchronistic was the mention of the Amazon Jungle, and the large, advanced civilizations they had in the recent past down there. Hancock mentioned how he thinks the Jungle was/is actually a man-made garden, and talked about Terra Preta (Black Soil), which Shamangineer mentioned previously on the Peter Allen episode (and video re-posted above). The bio-rich soil also known as Black Gold makes land hyper-fertile and according to Graham, we don't really know how, although I'm sure the answers are out there.

    The podcast is highly recommended, as well as the previous ones he did with Randal Carlson (very focused on the evidences). It goes into henges in the Amazon detected by Lidar; ESP; Drug prohibition and so much more juicy stuff, incl. Pireis Rei maps.

    I thought I had to share this piece of info here. And I'd love to know more, already got this book from my library so can't wait for that :)
     
    #32 enjoypolo, Apr 24, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2019
  13. rani

    rani Well-Known Member

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    More great stuff, EP! Thanks for the share. i read a lot of the blue economy papers you linked to. So interesting to see how many of the projects involved vortices! I will try and listen to the Joe Rogan podcast, but honestly, (the first and) last time I listened to him, he spent the first ten minutes yelling at me about bro-shakes and I just had to switch off. Made me appreciate Greg a whole lot more. : )
     
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  14. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    That's hilarious, yet so true :) But no, episodes like this one are why I got into Joe in the first place many years ago. This one might the best in Hancock's series, at least for me. It really hits the zeitgeist.
    And thanks for the Reich book recommendations, I shall check them out next.

    PS: Some tinkering projects I'm experimenting with:
    1) Ollas: A low-tech, DIY way to water plants in the garden. Consists simply in taking an earthen pot, cover the draining hole with putty (I used gaff-tape, but putty works best); putting it in the soil and filling it with water (and cover it). Supposedly, plant roots get their water through the earthenware's walls when they need it. F-king genius.


    2) DIY Vortexer using some garbage material: Perrier bottle caught my eye for its egg-y shape. Great to use it for vortexing water into my bottle. The kitchen paper cardboard is just an idea to extend the funnel (ideally, to be able to suck down the dirt in the middle and output the clean water from the sides; repeat few times until coffee comes out crystal clear *dreams*:rolleyes:)

    3)Dew harvester. This may not work, but still worth a try. It's basically based on the dew/rain water collector pointed out above. I initially was going to use a mycelated coffee-filter, with the benefits being a hydrophobic surface + bio-bacterial filter. But time-consuming and lazy as I am, I opted for a synthetic, commercial, mulch protector (hydrophobic still). A scaled version as you can tell, but just for testing.

    4) I sacrificed my best growing Oyster mycelium a month ago, to mix it in the soil of my planter. The result after a rather chilly month: Soil is now myceliated :) But cardboard walls still unaffected.

    Lots of trial and error, and learning from the mistakes made. Spending time on an island and how much water is a precious resource really makes me want to figure out a way to collect water and use it wisely. It's one thing to use wells and springs, it's a completely different one to get it from vegetation's transpiration (dew) and air (through condensation). Game changer stuff. Fingers crossed:rolleyes:

    PS: Some other similar devices:
    https://www.yankodesign.com/2010/07/05/beetle-juice-inspired/[​IMG]
    [​IMG]






    PPS: I realized my errors now (always learning), realizing that for condensation, the surface needs to be able to be cold (or heat reflexive). Ideally metals (wonder if copper has an advantage) or glass.
    I have tried another setup with a small metal funnel on top of container. We'll see how it goes :)

    PPS: I was able to download the instruction manual from Creating Water Foundation Facebook page. Compiled neatly into one PDF. Might wanna try to duplicate a scaled version of this, though not sure if my balcony can capture that much water. For the material, I'm thinking of using a blue IKEA bag I have.
    Come to think of it, the end of the bottom rain pipe (where water is collected) should be fitted with a compartmentalized PVC pipe filled with quartz marble that Shamangineer pointed out previously. That way, output water vortexed leads to better crop yield; vitalized water.
    And the containers like-wise should make use of curved shapes :D:rolleyes:
     

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    #34 enjoypolo, Apr 25, 2019
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  15. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    So this has been on my mind for a few weeks now, after being inspired in part by a book I've reading called Design Regenerative Cultures by Daniel Christian Wahl.
    Initially, I was going to create a new post called Regenerative Café as a place to share ideas, and discuss what a sustainable and regenerative future would like to us, as well as how to get there. But I figured since this post is already quite similar to the ideas mentioned in the book, might as well make good use of this garden.

    First of all, what an incredibly inspiring and powerful book this is. Daniel Wahl makes a great case about how we got to this point, where it seems like everything is falling apart, culturally, economically, ecologically, and even spiritually. At 267-pages, it doesn't seem like a long book, but it's so densely packed with information and resources that it took me a while to get to it (I'll get to this point later).

    One of the things I love about Wahl's approach is that throughout the book, he takes you on a quest to see how the dominant worldview based on separation between Us and Nature has taken us to the proverbial cliff, and that to really solve the problems, we need to start questioning our most basic underlying assumptions, and pretty much everything else. So instead of providing answers, he asks questions that invites us to think deeper. For example:

    What this does, is it turns a question (a challenge) into a platform that invites participants to have a conversation around it. As a result, the book is filled with insightful questions that we should ask ourselves before even trying to solve anything.

    I'd love to post some of the resources referenced in the book, as I feel they are very helpful to give us some context.

    The first one is a concept by Bill Sharpe called: The Three Horizons Approach (see attachments for photos)
    It's basically a mapping on a curve that tracks three Horizons:
    H1: World in Crisis or Business as Usual ("Sustaining Innovation keeps 'the lights on' and maintain status quo.")
    H2: World in Turbulent Transition (The 'Bridge')
    H3: A Viable World (The transformative innovations that will get us to a regenerative world)

    What is immediately apparent is how the three Hs are weaved in-and-out in synchronous fashion. It actually reminds me of three-phase power, but I digress. The important point about each H is that they are all co-existing, but simply differ in their prevalence.
    In other words, H3 already exists out there, whether it be in certain Black Projects within the US Military, or in deep down in the Amazon jungle, it's just not widely known/appreciated it yet.
    H2 is the bridge to transition from H1 to H3. For me, this represents things like Permaculture, Blue Economy initiatives, Blockchain technology, Meditation, etc. These fields have been developed by many people over many decades.
    The other tempting thing is that we shouldn't do is throwing the baby with the bathwater, meaning H1 despite its flaws still has lots of invaluable things that we require. Also, it's not like we can just crash and burn and rebuild civilization.

    A second one that I haven't really taken time to look at is a 'game' that invites us to think in Whole Systems Thinking. Devised by the IFF (International Futures Forum), it's called World Model and it emphasizes how interconnected each field is with everything else, and promotes resilience thinking. It's available for download for free, and it looks really fun (and time consuming) but I'd love to try it out someday.

    There are so many other incredible references and tools that we can use to promote awareness and participation, which I'll get to eventually, including stuff like the Peer-to-Peer(P2P)/Sharing economy.
    I will stop here for now.

    One thing that blew me away in terms of synchronicity, was that I actually purchased this book over two-years ago, after reading Robert David Steele's book-review about it. When it was delivered to me, I put the book away until literally a few weeks ago, when my partner suggested if I still wanted it (we're packing our stuff for moving soon). And in fact, contained within this book are multiple references to the Blue Economy and Gunter Pauli, as well Terra Preta (another recent synchronicity) when I had not known about these when I purchased it.
    So it's like a big, full circle :)
    There are only so many topics, and books I can read with my time, but one thing I've come to realize, is that I have faith in that the Universe will provide me with the appropriate knowledge/tools when I'm ready.

    This felt like that sort of hand being extended to me.

    Some related readings and links:
    - IFF World Game: http://www.internationalfuturesforum.com/world-game
    - The Designer’s Role in Facilitating Sustainable Solutions (Wahl & Baxter, 2008) - Article
    - Open-Source Manifesto by Robert David Steele (Book)
    - Global Ecovillage Network

    - Transitions Network
     

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    #35 enjoypolo, Apr 28, 2019
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  16. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    In the spirit of zero-waste and regenerative cultures, lately, many synchronicities have popped up in my daily life.
    One of them, previously mentioned is the biochar (terra preta) which I'm reading a book on, and looks incredible the more I learn about it.
    The synchronicity was that while I travalled to Salt Spring Island last week, before I left, we found ourselves in one of the many parks there, which had an old terra cotta chimney used to make charcoal a hundred years ago, by the tiny minority of Japanese immigrants who migrated in Canada. I knew then these were sign-posts I had to pay attention to.

    Another great find is the video below with Alex Eaton at the Bioneers conference, who made this biodigester for small farmers that allows the 'fermentation' of waste, while producing natural gas and organic fertilizer with which to cook, and grow food. I love that it looks like a very simple, and relatively cheap system.

    It dawned on me that, the symbiosis of collecting waste > generating natural gas/fertilizer > burn coals > fertile soil with plants/food > collecting waste.. ad infinitum is a possibility, albeit an idealistic one. Not to mention, in this case, the fecal waste of humans is turned into a precious resource. So anyways, I felt like this needed to be shared :)

    Happy Labour day everyone.



    Systema Bio (Bio Digester) on the field:


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    PS: Case-study in Mexico City with sanitation projects making use of this biodigester.
    One work I'm involved in is event production, and outdoors mobile washrooms is generally present wherever I go. I feel like that could potentially be a gold mine if used correctly.
    Golden sh!t brew is what it really is!
     
    #36 enjoypolo, May 1, 2019
    Last edited: May 1, 2019
  17. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    Here are some (potentially) useful links in the Peer-toPeer (P2P) Economy. Some of them I've used, others hopefully will be inspiring:

    - Craigslist.com : Famous, and commonly used in English speaking countries/communities. Used for buying second hand; services; even finding work. Useful in certain situations.

    - Kiva.org: Micro-loan platforms to give loans to people all over the world who need it for various reasons. Great way to fund entrepreneurs, and sowing seeds of love. Although it generally takes time to get loans repaid, I've never had issues. This group helps water access ;)

    Here are some I recently discovered through the book Design Regenerative Cultures:
    - Avaaz.org: Global community for people-powered decision making. Used apparently for signing petitions all over the world.
    - Zopa.com: Like Kiva, but this one is meant for anybody: Loans offered to those who need; bypasses banks to fund directly in P2P spirit.
    - Erento.com: This one looks like service-sharing platform. Need a car, or tools for an occasion, or other resources? This may be useful, though mainly in Europe.
    - ServiceSpace: Community-driven service platform. Looks promising.

    In Amsterdam, there's even an app called Olio, that connects users with restaurants so that surplus food is not wasted. Think Food Delivery but at a discount for food that otherwise goes to garbage. Pretty neat service.

    P2P Foundation: for more information on resources and network.
    Interestingly, I came upon a link thru the foundation, to a blockchain-based UBI system that's entirely self-running, to redistribute currency flow to fund a UBI. Little off-topic, but considering some of the polemics on the forum, I thought it'd be relevant (of course, there are other similar projects marrying UBI & Blockchain).

    If you know other platforms, please feel free to share.
     
    #37 enjoypolo, May 1, 2019
    Last edited: May 1, 2019
  18. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    This is more of a brief book review, but I figured it fits right in here:
    Terra Preta: How the World's Most Fertile Soil Can Help Reverse Climate Change and Reduce World Hunger
    by Ute Scheub, Haiko Pieplow, Hans-Peter Schmidt & Kathleen Draper

    After countless synchronicities in the past month regarding the topic of Terra Preta, I decided to try and figure out what's it about, and how to DIY it. This book did not disappoint: it's a practical book that's divided into Story (Theory) and Action (DIY methods). So you can in fact skip right into the second half to learn how to make it if you're in a rush.
    The first part is a brief overview of current, unsustainable, and destructive methods of farming. It also gives some context regarding the history of Terra Preta, including in the Amazon region, where terra preta is still flourishing and nourishing the soils after hundreds, if not thousands of years. Talk about a lasting legacy!

    From my understanding Terra Preta is a mix of various processes:
    1) Bio-char: Wood and/or organic waste material (twigs; corn/rice husks; anything that has carbon pretty much) burned in a low-oxygen process (pyrolysis). This can be done in different ways, but the book focuses on one method called the Kon-Tiki Kiln: It's basically a conical drum-can. When making biochar, there isn't any smoke, and it should not turn into ashes. More on that later in the videos.

    2) Micro-Organisms: Fascinating insights into how microorganisms such as Lactobacillus responsible for digestion/fermentation process that breaks down organisms. This step is crucial in the proper decomposing of the organic waste and it's basically like growing mycelium (it is mycelium in fact).

    3) Organic waste: I love that it not only include traditional compost waste (plants; kitchen waste) but also includes meat (bones), fish (phosphorus). Although this may attract vermines, so you'd better be careful about closing lids properly.

    4) Optional, but really fascinating: Animal and Human waste: Urine and feces. This was a fascination for me, for I had never really looked into how nutritious those two could be. I'd heard mixed things about excrements as fertilizers. What I discovered, is that feces can indeed spread pathogens and bacteria, as well foul smell, if improperly treated. For instance, I learned that urine (even water) and feces shouldn't mix. The latter should be kept separated and add a bit of biochar and Micro-Organisms or straw;sawdust to make the smells disappear.
    It's essential that waste are fermented properly before being used, otherwise they'll just damage/kill the plants.

    The best advice from the book is: Trust your nose. If it smells bad, you made a mistake (either fermentation hasn't really worked. Add biochar and micro-organisms for smell.

    I never knew that urine is very rich in Nitrogen, and could be a super rich fertilizer for plants (dilluted in 1:10 water solution).

    By all means, the fourth point is optional, and works well without. But it's also the secret original recipe. I would definitely think twice about doing this in the future :Do_O

    But my favourite part, and this is one of my eccentricity: I've always been attracted by toilets in general. Maybe it was growing up in Japan, where toilets are straight-up from the future (and much more energy/water efficient; elderly-friendly). But I really appreciate a nice, functional toilet. I also find it appalling that in much of the Western hemisphere, we just flush drink-quality water down the drain. In France, it's quite common to not flush urine at night, which many foreigners (especially Japanese) find disgusting, but hey, it's saving water:eek::p
    One of those weird dreams I've had for a long time was one day designing a beautiful, functional toilet.
    And in fact, at the very end of the book, a case-study of Hamburg's Central Railway Station was the cherry on top: They have Terra-Preta producing washrooms that use very little or no water, while outputing fermented terra preta ready to be used on soils. Even the pipes are transparent to showcase, and visualize the process.

    Love it, I'd love perhaps one day, combine the Egg-Shape-Vortexer toilet, that could extract nutrients from urine; turn into clean water (in essence 'producing its own flush water') while also creating rich fertilizer and bio-gas for home energy. It's definitely difficult, although not impossible. Schauberger-Mycelium-Terra-preta-biodigester toilet.:rolleyes:

    So anyways, the book is highly recommended if you're interested, and below are some resources from the book.

    Realizing how little I knew about soil and symbiosis, it's an awe-inspiring experience. For one thing, I ignored how important Mulching is for soil humidity/nutrient retention as well as protecting organisms from UV. I love the wine-case methods of stacking boxes of plants on top of boxes of terra preta.

    And so much more that I haven't addressed: Square-gardening method; Rotational crops; Companion planting. There's an even a section where it's all Q&A, so very helpful overall.
    Will be making my terra preta? Probably not right away, but shall experiment soon.

    In fact, I had an insight recently, about how Soil ecology may be a mirror reflection of Aether ecology: Full of organisms that we may not perceive with our senses (ie, worms;organisms / plasma beings). Probably just a stoner thought, but who knows right? As above so below :D

    Kon Tiki kiln:


    More info on Biochar Journal (for all things biochar):
    https://www.biochar-journal.org/en/ct/39

    Urban Gardening experiments with terra preta in Berlin, Germany:
    https://prinzessinnengarten.net/about/

    German engineering at its finest:
    http://www.berger-biotechnik.com/downloads/terranovacompostingtoiletsystem.pdf
    Sweden's Stockholm BioChar Project also ahead of the curve: http://www.nordregio.org/sustainable_cities/stockholm-biochar-project/

    Also loved the numerous Art works inspired by Terra Preta and Biochar:
    Here, Australian artist Georgina Pollard: https://www.biochar-journal.org/en/ct/97-Falling-in-Love-with-Carbon-–-Biochar-Art-Work
    Ayumi Matsuzaka (Berlin-based Japanese artist whose work involved terra preta performances): http://www.ayumi-matsuzaka.com/all-my-cycle with even instructions on DIY.

    PS: I've already been mixing my pure cannabis joints ashes with my compost, but I wonder if mycelium would get a boost from that as well. Lots of experiments to try out soon:rolleyes:
     

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  19. shamangineer

    shamangineer Well-Known Member

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    It has been a while since I checked in, what a trove! Great job Enjoypolo on dropping the 411 for the masses. I thank you on their behalf.
     
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  20. enjoypolo

    enjoypolo Moderator
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    Thanks to you my friend, I had actually ignored the biochar reference at first listening of the Peter Allen episode, but saw a comment of you mentioning Terra Preta and paramagnetism. Then Graham Hancock mentioned it, and many more synchronicities along.

    Regarding Micro-Organisms (MO) i'm basically using kombucha I had made (but which was way too sour to drink), which is a fermented tea brew with an alien living inside.:D